22 Jun

Achill and the Wild Atlantic Way

Post by In1 Solutions on Blog

No trip to magical Mayo is complete without a visit to beautiful Achill Island.

Achill is only an hour and a half’s drive from Twin Trees Hotel and Leisure Club, and is one of the places you have to visit before you die!

From Mulranny, you take a short jaunt across the Corraun Peninsula to Achill which itself is spectacular – from Corraun Hill you can drink in views of Clew Bay and the Mullet Peninsula to the north.

Our favourite means of travel for this part is by bike or on foot as the Western Greenway follows the most scenic route across the bridge at Achill Sound and on to the island of Achill where people have lived for thousands of years.

The easy option is to take the car to travel the Atlantic drive and loop around the island’s minor roads.

One minute you will pass golden strand and cliff pass, then drive down a mountain and across bog. Otherwise, you can stop and relax in one of the island’s traditional Irish pubs – Achill embodies the Wild Atlantic Way.

Places To Visit

Keel Beach  is superb for water sports with the spectacular Slievemore rising dramatically behind it. On the slopes of Slievemore, you can visit the Deserted Village, abandoned from the time of An Gorta Mór, the Great Hunger.

Head west through Dooagh and up over the cliff road to the very end of the road. Keem Bay is the surprise that awaits you – a small Blue Flag beach in a sheltered bay and perfect for snorkelling.

History is never far away no matter where you go on Achill Island. There are holy wells and Mortello Towers which testify to the religious and military history of the area. Carrickkildavnet Castle on the south east coast is a must-see. Built in the 1400s by the O’Malley Clan, it was later the stronghold of the famous Gráinne Mhaol, or Grace O’Malley – the Pirate Queen.

Twin Trees Hotel Offers

Whether is a romantic break or activity holiday, Twin Trees Hotel will have an offer to suit your needs. Book online for the best rate guaranteed.

Further Information

Visit the Wild Atlantic Way website